Category Archives: Federal Government

CCCOB: Government Careers Information Forum

Come meet representative from federal, state, and municipal government organizations including the FBI, State Department, Secret Service, Commonwealth of MA, MA Department of Environmental Protection, MA Division of Banks, MA Executive Office of Health & Human Services, and many more. This event includes round table discussions and networking opportunities. Business attire suggested.

WHEN: Wednesday, April 18, 2013 from 1:00-3:00PM
WHERE: Boston University Career Development, 100 Bay State Road, Sixth Floor Boston, MA 02215
WHO: All BC Students, free admission!

*College Career Centers of Boston (CCCOB) is a collaborative effort by Emmanuel College, Boston College, Boston University, Emerson University, Simmons College, & Suffolk University.

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Foreign Service Careers Lunch and Learn with BC alum Colin Cleary

Oh the Places You’ll Go!
by Claire Ruffing, class of 2011


On Thursday, October 14th, Foreign Service Officer and BC alum Colin Cleary sat down to lunch with students to discuss a career in Foreign Affairs.  Having worked in the State Department for 23 years at 6 embassies and assorted “state-side” assignments, he gave great insights into the application process and life of a Foreign Service Officer.

Why:
Uncle Sam Wants YOU: The Foreign Service is a career opportunity, not a job placement.  Beyond the free housing, paid R&R, and subsidized travel, the Foreign Service invests time and energy into developing YOU into a tool of foreign policy, including language training, regional casework, and leadership skills.

Variety is the Spice of Life: While the Foreign Service asks you specialize in a “cone” of responsibilities (Political, Economic, Consular, Public Diplomacy, and Management), you change positions and countries every two to three years, so there is always an adventure around the corner.

Serve Your Country: As a Foreign Service Officer, you get to be the face of the United States; depending on your post, you may be one of the only Americans people meet.  As such, you get to learn about your own culture, be involved in critical situations and decisions, and constructively serve your country.

How:
Take the Test: The application process takes a while to go through, so if you are thinking about the Foreign Service as a career, log on to the website http://careers.state.gov/. If you pass the initial written test, the next stages in a series of short answer questions, then an intensive day-long session of interviews.  Remember- the test is free, so good luck!

Read, Read, Read: The Economist, the Foreign Service Journal, the New York Times, American literature, political blogs, your coursework for political science/journalism/economics/anything foreign policy related that interests you.

Listen to Jazz: Imagine you’re at a fancy embassy party- what would safe topics be for someone to start a conversation? Jazz, art, sports, and pop culture.  That doesn’t mean you have to like them, just be familiar with them- everyone loves a good conversationalist!

A Word to the Wise:
The Foreign Service is not for everyone.

For one, the process is very competitive. Applicants can, and are encouraged to, reapply, so don’t worry if you have to take the test or interview a couple of times.  If you really want it, keep trying!

Another thing, your personal life becomes a challenge.  Some people do just fine- some couples travel together, or are both in the Foreign Service and try and coordinate their job placements.  But for others the constant change can get in the way of having a “traditional” family life and makes keeping in touch with friends and family back home more difficult.

Finally, politics matter.  You are an instrument of foreign policy, but that doesn’t mean you get to write the music.  You may find yourself disagreeing with aspects of foreign policy that you are, nevertheless, expected to implement and promote abroad. Also, with the new structure of the Foreign Service, young-and-single Officers are being encouraged to look at placements in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Pakistan to help develop a civil government-based foreign policy in those militarized areas.

Bottom Line:
Puzzlingly under-represented at Boston College, the Foreign Service fits well with Education of the Whole Person, and Men and Women for Others, two fundamental tenants of education here at BC.  If the Whys outweigh the Words to the Wise, then the Foreign Service may be for you.  As always, explore more on the web at http://careers.state.gov/, and good luck in your adventures!

OH THE PLACES YOU’LL GO! 

On Thursday, October 14th, Foreign Service Officer and BC alum Colin Cleary sat down to lunch with students to discuss a career in Foreign Affairs.  Having worked in the State Department for 23 years at 6 embassies and assorted “state-side” assignments, he gave great insights into the application process and life of a Foreign Service Officer.

Why:

Uncle Sam Wants YOU: The Foreign Service is a career opportunity, not a job placement.  Beyond the free housing, paid R&R, and subsidized travel, the Foreign Service invests time and energy into developing YOU into a tool of foreign policy, including language training, regional casework, and leadership skills.

Variety is the Spice of Life: While the Foreign Service asks you specialize in a “cone” of responsibilities (Political, Economic, Consular, Public Diplomacy, and Management), you change positions and countries every two to three years, so there is always an adventure around the corner.

Serve Your Country: As a Foreign Service Officer, you get to be the face of the United States; depending on your post, you may be one of the only Americans people meet.  As such, you get to learn about your own culture, be involved in critical situations and decisions, and constructively serve your country.

How:

Take the Test: The application process takes a while to go through, so if you are thinking about the Foreign Service as a career, log on to the website http://careers.state.gov/. If you pass the initial written test, the next stages in a series of short answer questions, then an intensive day-long session of interviews.  Remember- the test is free, so good luck!

Read, Read, Read: The Economist, the Foreign Service Journal, the New York Times, American literature, political blogs, your coursework for political science/journalism/economics/anything foreign policy related that interests you.

Listen to Jazz: Imagine you’re at a fancy embassy party- what would safe topics be for someone to start a conversation? Jazz, art, sports, and pop culture.  That doesn’t mean you have to like them, just be familiar with them- everyone loves a good conversationalist!

A Word to the Wise:

The Foreign Service is not for everyone.

For one, the process is very competitive. Applicants can, and are encouraged to, reapply, so don’t worry if you have to take the test or interview a couple of times.  If you really want it, keep trying!

Another thing, your personal life becomes a challenge.  Some people do just fine- some couples travel together, or are both in the Foreign Service and try and coordinate their job placements.  But for others the constant change can get in the way of having a “traditional” family life and makes keeping in touch with friends and family back home more difficult.

Finally, politics matter.  You are an instrument of foreign policy, but that doesn’t mean you get to write the music.  You may find yourself disagreeing with aspects of foreign policy that you are, nevertheless, expected to implement and promote abroad. Also, with the new structure of the Foreign Service, young-and-single Officers are being encouraged to look at placements in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Pakistan to help develop a civil government-based foreign policy in those militarized areas.

Bottom Line:

Puzzlingly under-represented at Boston College, the Foreign Service fits well with Education of the Whole Person, and Men and Women for Others, two fundamental tenants of education here at BC.  If the Whys outweigh the Words to the Wise, then the Foreign Service may be for you.  As always, explore more on the web at http://careers.state.gov/, and good luck in your adventures!

Department Of Health And Human Services Hiring

The Department Of Health And Human Services is hiring recent grads or those about to graduate across the country.

Become a part of the Department that touches the lives of every American! At the Department of Health and Human Services you can give back to your community, state, and country by making a difference in the lives of Americans everywhere. Join HHS and help to make our world healthier, safer and better for all Americans.

This position is located nationwide, Office of the Secretary (OS), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

This is an Open Continuous Announcement with the following cut-off dates:
1st Cut-off date April 23, 2010
2nd Cut-off date May 21, 2010
3rd Cut-off date June 25, 2010
4th Cut-off date July 23, 2010
5th Cut-off date Aug 13, 2010
Final Cut-off date Aug 27, 2010

For more information and position details: http://jobview.usajobs.gov/GetJob.aspx?JobID=87275880&JobTitle=Criminal+Investigator&sort=rv%2c-dtex&cn=&rad_units=miles&brd=3876&pp=50&jbf522=1811&jbf574=HE*&vw=b&re=134&FedEmp=Y&FedPub=Y&caller=advanced.aspx&AVSDM=2010-04-05+05%3a24%3a00

RealJobs: Tara Foley

Tara Foley’s work day on Tuesday, February 9, 2010.

This morning started at 7 a.m. with coffee at Starbucks.  (Forgive me!  I adore my neighborhood European cafés for a leisurely Saturday afternoon coffee, but only Starbucks offers the elusive to-go cup on a rushed Tuesday morning!)  It’s a busy week at work and it’s just starting to snow.  By the end of the day, Geneva is a veritable winter wonderland.

Making my way through the work day, filled with meetings and frantic Blackberry messages about last-minute changes to said meetings, this blog is on my mind.  This process has made me reflect on the path I took from Chestnut Hill to Geneva, and how I found myself in the Foreign Service.

At BC, I participated in service-oriented groups like the Emerging Leadership Program (ELP) and the Arrupe International Solidarity Program.  I also discovered a love for languages, travel, and foreign cultures.  After experiencing September 11, 2001 on my fourth day of college, I took up Arabic and a minor in Middle East and Islamic Studies.  This led to study abroad programs in Morocco and the UK.  And finally, an internship with the State Department in Washington, DC.  I was hooked.

BC instilled in me the idea that through my career choice, I could contribute to a greater good.  I was looking for a vocation, not just a job.  A career in public service felt like a good fit, and so did the foreign affairs focus of the State Department.  The Foreign Service seemed to me a good answer to Father Himes’ three questions: What do you love?  What are you good at?  What does the world need?  The Foreign Service allows me to put my interest and knowledge of foreign cultures to work for the good of our country.  What’s better than that?  The travel, language training, and diplomatic passport are just icing on the cake.

I think BC students and alumni have a lot to offer the State Department.  That desire to “set the world aflame” never really leaves us.  If you’re looking for a career that combines public service and overseas experience, the Foreign Service is a great choice.  The website http://careers.state.gov gives information about State Department internships as well as Foreign Service and other career paths at the Department.  Maybe we’ll bump into each other at an airport somewhere…

Lunch & Learn: Inside the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services

Hear about opportunities with the Department of Health and Human Services regarding jobs and internships.  Jon-Paul Correira, Assistant Special Agent, will provide information and tips for landing a position in this field.

When: Wednesday, October 28, 2009 at 12pm

Where: Boston Room

RSVP via EagleLink for this event and others in the Workshops for Government Opportunities Series.

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Lunch & Learn: Federal Government Jobs & the FBI

Come hear advice from Special Agent Krista Toole of the FBI on how to apply for jobs and internships with the federal government and hear about programs with the FBI office.

When: Thursday, October 22, 2009 at 12pm

Where: Shea Room, 2nd floor of Conte Forum

RSVP via EagleLink for this event and others in the Workshops for Government Opportunities Series.

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Lunch & Learn: Federal Government Jobs & Internships

Interested in Working for the Federal Government? – An essential introduction to the many opportunities available for all majors in federal service; a federal agency representative will be on hand to field Q&A.

When: Wednesay, October 21, 2009 at 12pm

Where:  Campanella 250

RSVP via EagleLink for this event and others in the Workshops for Government Opportunities Series.

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