Category Archives: Education

Science, Math, and Tech Bi-Weekly Career Update!

Thanks to all who made it to the Career Fair last week! We hope that this week’s SMT Career Update is useful!

In this Newsletter: Feature, Upcoming Events at BC, Events in Boston, National Events/Seminars , Job & Internship Opportunities, Cool News from the Field

FEATURE

hgInterested in the Tech Industry? Check out the Fall 2013 Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Boston Tech Community with information on meet-ups, events and resources on tech and tech careers in the Boston area!

UPCOMING EVENTS AT BC

alliedhealthimageAllied Health Careers Night
When: Tomorrow!
Wednesday, September 25
5:30pm (Higgins 335D): Optometry Panel
6:00pm (Higgins 310): Physician Assistant & Nurse Practitioner Panel
6:00pm (Higgins 235): Genetic Counseling Panel
6:00pm (Higgins 260): Physical Therapy Panel
7:00pm in Higgins Atrium: Q&A and Refreshments with Professionals
Open to ALL students. RSVP on EagleLink.

Life Sciences & the Health Professions – Professors and Pastries
When: Wednesday, October 2
3:30-5:00pm
Where: Stokes S140
Meet informally with your professors, advisors, and professionals about different topics each week. Fancy pastries abound!

LeaderShape at Boston College
When: January 5-10, 2014
Where: Off-site retreat TBA
Submit your application by Oct. 18!
Check out the LeaderShape website for more information on the program.
Contact the Student Programs Office with any questions.

EVENTS IN BOSTON

Harvard Biotech Career Fair
When: Monday, September 30 — 1:00-5:00pm
Where: New Research Building (3rd floor Rotunda), Harvard Medical School
Intended for PhDs, MDs, and Post-Doctoral Fellows.
No registration required. Cost: $40

EnerNOC Networking Night
When: Monday, Septmeber 30 — 6:00-9:00pm
Where: 1 Marina Park Dr., Fifth Floor, Boston, MA
Registration is required. Cost is free.green careers final

Reminder: Massachusetts Green Career Conference – Thursday, October 3 – Registration is required.

National Events/Seminars

Science and Health Policy: Critical Issues Seminar – The Public Leadership Education Network
January 6-9, 2014 – Washington, DC

Job & Internship Opportunities

Science/Math/Tech in Education

Computer Science/IT – All On EagleLink

  • IT Leadership Development Program – ThermoFisher Scientific
  • Software Quality Engineer – Vistaprintvistaprint
  • Multiple Internships with Insegment, Inc.
  • Automation Engineer – Belvedere Trading LLC

Research Positions

Policy

  • Health Policy Intern – New England Healthcare Institute – EagleLink

Leadership

What’s Happening? Cool News from the Field

galaxy_universe-normalThe 10 Most Important Questions in Science
What is the universe made of? What is consciousness? Why do we dream? Lots to explore as you consider a career in the sciences!

Thanks for tuning in for another week of the SMT Career Update! Please leave comments below or email us at ccasga@bc.edu with any feedback or thoughts on what would be helpful for you in this update!

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Hundreds of international teaching jobs!

The Career Center subscribes to a wonderful resource, The International Educator (TIE) for international and overseas jobs.   Over 300 international and American overseas schools advertise their vacancies on a regular basis in TIE. Browse the website for up-to-the-minute job openings and  put your personal data in our website’s resume bank.

BC Students may access the login and password for TIE on EagleLink in the Document Library.

the intl ed

Five Quick Tips for Today’s MERC Education Fair

Massachusetts Educational Recruiting Consortium (MERC) is today!

TIP 1 – Look your best – wear a suit. It may be okay to show up for your job in casual clothes, but you’ll be taken more seriously at the fair if you wear a suit. If you don’t have a suit, try to borrow one. Next choice is a pair of dress pants (or for women, a conservative skirt), a blazer or sport coat, a clean, pressed shirt and, for men, a tie.

TIP 2 – Don’t carry a backpack inside the fair. A backpack screams “I’m a student!” but you want to convey the message that you are ready to take on a professional role. If you can, leave your backpack at home. DO bring a leather portfolio or notepad holder, which should have room for a pad to take notes, extra copies of your resume, and a pen.

TIP 3 – Do some research, have a few questions. Prioritize your top schools or districts, do a little research, and see if you can come up with a couple of informed questions for your top choices. (For example, “I have experience teaching the math system you use – how is that working out for your elementary schools?”) For MERC, go to http://merc.experience.com. Under “Students” on the right, click on “Visit our website,” then click on “Registered Organizations.”

TIP 4 – Know your strengths. When someone asks you what you do well as an educator, you should be able to cite three or more strengths and provide one or more examples of each. Experienced job fair candidates know to work up a 30-second “personal commercial” (otherwise known as an “elevator speech”) that highlights these strengths. For more on this strategy, click on the video at http://www.bc.edu/edfair

TIP 5 – Send thank you letters. Be sure to get business cards at the fair, or if those are unavailable, get the correct spelling for each person, plus their title. More information on thank you notes is at http://www.bc.edu/offices/careers/skills/letters/thanks.html

merc

Five Quick Tips for TODAY’s BC’s K-12 Education Career Fair

Today from 3:30-7:00 PM in the Heights Room ed fair crop

TIP 1 – Look your best – wear a suit.
It may be okay to show up for your job in casual clothes, but you’ll be taken more seriously at the fair if you wear a suit. If you don’t have a suit, try to borrow one. Next choice is a pair of dress pants (or for women, a skirt), a blazer or sport coat, a clean, pressed shirt and, for men, a tie.

TIP 2 – Don’t carry a backpack inside the fair.
A backpack screams “I’m a student!” but you want to convey the message that you are ready to take on a professional role. If you can, leave your backpack at home. If you have to bring it to the Heights Room, leave it behind the registration table. DO bring a leather portfolio or notepad holder, which should have room for a pad to take notes, extra copies of your resume, and a pen.

TIP 3 – Do some research, have a few questions.
Prioritize your top schools or districts, do a little research, and see if you can come up with a couple of informed questions for your top choices. (For example, “I have experience teaching the math system you use – how is that working out for your elementary schools?”) Current BC students start your research in EagleLink – https://bc-csm.symplicity.com/students/  (log in and click on Events, then Career Fairs); all others see the employer profiles under “List of 2013 Registered Employers” at http://www.bc.edu/edfair

TIP 4 – Know your strengths.
When someone asks you what you do well as an educator, you should be able to cite three or more strengths and provide one or more examples of each. Experienced job fair candidates know to work up a 30-second “personal commercial” (otherwise known as an “elevator speech”) that highlights these strengths. For more on this strategy, click on the video at http://www.bc.edu/edfair

TIP 5 – Send thank you letters.
Be sure to get business cards at the fair, or if those are unavailable, get the correct spelling for each person, plus their title. More information on thank you notes is at http://www.bc.edu/offices/careers/skills/letters/thanks.html

Boston College K-12 Education Career Fair

For BC students and alumni.

Wednesday, March 13, 2013, 3:30-7:00 PM

To register and for a complete list of employers, visit our website.

ed fair flyer 2013

RealJobs: Sofia Mohammed

Hello Good People,

I am a 6th Grade Math Teacher and Grade-Level Chair with a hint of a school nurse, hallway/cafeteria monitor, traffic patrol officer, counselor, housekeeper, fundraiser, and advocate. While there is a routine that I follow, there are always unexpected events that pop up and require me to take action.
Sofia
6:50am – Arrived to school. Did last minute tidying up of my classroom.
7:00am – Tutorial. I started out my day with a scholar who has been on medical leave for about a month now. She is starting to feel better so I met with her to catch her up on some of the material she missed. She is one of my sweetest and most awesome scholars, so I was super excited to see her and looked forward to working with her.
7:55am – Hallway duty. I went out to my hallway to ensure that all scholars were going into their lockers and homerooms silently (my school has a policy of silent transitions) and issued consequences to those not meeting the expectations.
8:05am – Planning period. The greatest thing about having 1st-period planning is that I have extra time to edit and spice up my lessons if need be. However, what usually happens is I end up fighting with the one copy machine for the whole building that decides to act up that morning, covering a class for a teacher who’s stuck in traffic, assisting with uniform checks, helping a sick scholar, or analyzing scholars’ penmanship for the “Writing on the Bathroom Walls” investigation. Today, I stopped a nosebleed.
9:05am to 11:05 – Taught my 2nd and 3rd period classes. I went out to the hallway during class periods to ensure scholars are transitioning silently.
11:10am – Lunch. I escorted my scholars down to the cafe and made sure they immediately sat down or got on the lunch line. While I warmed up my food in the teacher’s lounge, I vented to my Assistant Principal about curriculum issues and set up a meeting to strategize and fix the problem. I went back out to the cafe to monitor the scholars and make sure they were not getting up from their seats without permission, talking too loud, or in any type of danger. After eating quickly, I collected field-trip permission slips and money. Then, I chased down my other Assistant Principal so that I can hand over the money.
11:35am – Transition to 4th period. I dismissed the scholars (by table cleanliness) to their 4th period classes. I ensured their silence and professionalism. I issued consequences to those not meeting expectations.
11:45am – 2:55pm – Taught my 4th, 5th, 6th periods. Again, I went out to the hallway during class periods to ensure scholars are transitioning silently.
3:00pm – Houses! My school has a House System where every scholar is in a House named after a positive characteristic. There are 10 Houses in total and they meet once a month. On days Houses meet, scholars go to their House location rather than going to their 7th period academic class. At the House meetings, scholars participate in a character development, community service, fundraising, and/or advocacy activity. I, along with the 8th grade Science Teacher, advise House of Knowledge. During this particular House meeting, the scholars created patches for the school’s black history quilt. They illustrated African American historical figures and contributions to the world.
3:50pm – Dismissal. I escorted the scholars who are in House of Knowledge down to the fitness area, where they are held until their names are called for dismissal. I ensured that they were silent in the fitness area.
4:00pm – Traffic Patrol. About half of the scholars get picked up after school by their parents or whomever is in the carpool agreement. I directed traffic to ensure the safety of the scholars as well as their families.
4:30pm – Grade-Level/Team Meeting. I led the team meeting and conducted 6th-grade business. Items on the agenda included Scholars of the Month, Friday’s raffle drawing, Hall/Cafeteria Culture, contacting parents, etc…
5:15pm – Faculty Meeting (whole school).
6:30pm – Return to my classroom to tidy up.
6:40pm – Exit the school building and drive out of the parking lot.
More to come…

Volunteer & Civic Engagement Fair

Learn about volunteer opportunities and how to be civically
engaged on campus and in the Boston Community!

Thursday, January 24th
11:30 am – 2:30 pm
Gasson 100

For more information please visit the VSLC or Civic Engagement websites.

There will also be a trivia game to win prizes and a Civic Literacy Test to be entered into a raffle for a $50 gift certificate to the bookstore!

CE Fair